Legend: +  positive 90-100%, - negative 90-100%, [+] positive 75-89%, [-] negative 75-89%, d positive 25-74% of strains
Genus Cedecea
Taxonomy
Morphology
Cultural characteristics
Biochemical characters
Ecology
Pathogenicity
References
Phylum Proteobacteria, Class Gammaproteobacteria, Order Enterobacteriales, Family Enterobacteriaceae, Genus Cedecea,
Cedecea davisae Grimont et al. 1981 - type species of the genus,
Cedecea lapagei Grimont et al. 1981,
Cedecea neteri Farmer et al. 1983,
“Cedecea species 3”,
“Cedecea species 5”.
Gram-negative rods, 0.6-0.7 x 1.3-1.9 μm. Motile by 5-9 peritrichous flagella.
Colonies on nutrient agar are 1.5 mm in diameter (24 h, 37 °C), nonpigmented.
Facultatively anaerobic. Incubation temperature 25-37 °C.
Media: Trypticase Soy Agar with 5% sheep blood.
Nutrient Agar (Oxoid CM3) (beef extract 1 g, yeast extract 2 g, peptone 5 g, NaCl 5 g,
agar 15 g, distilled water 1l, pH 7,4).
Isolated from human clinical specimens (blood, sputum, wounds, gallbladder, eye, abscess, throat), feces, some parasitic
arthropods & cockroaches
Blatta germania and Blatta orientalis. Resistant to colistin, polymyxin, penicillin, ampicillin & cephalothin.
Opportunistic pathogen. Associated with infections in humans (bacteremia), one report of C. lapagei peritonitis after surgical
intervention. Appears to be a tick pathogen: females of the tick
B. microplus may be infected with Cedecea lapagei which destroys the
epithelium of the vaginal area.
  1. J. G. Holt et al., 1994. Facultatively Anaerobic Gram-Negative Rods. Subgroup 1. Family Enterobacteriaceae. In: Begey’s Manual of
    Determinative Bacteriology, 9th-edition, Williams & Wilkins, pp 175-189.
  2. Don J. Brenner and J.J. Farmer III, 2001. Family I. Enterobacteriaceae. In: Bergey’s Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, Second
    edition, Vol two, part B, George M. Garrity (Editor-in-Chief), pp 587-897.
  3. Grimont (P.A.D.), Ggrimont (F.), Farmer III (J.J.) and Asbury (M.A.): Cedecea davisae gen. nov., sp. nov. and Cedecea    lapagei sp.
    nov., new Enterobacteriaceae from clinical specimens. Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol., 1981, 31, 317-326;
  4. Farmer III (J.J.), Sheth (N.K.), Hudzinski (J.A.), Rose(H.D.) and Asburi (M.F.): Int. J. Syst. Bacteriol., 1983, 33, 438-440. Bacteremia
    due to Cedecea neteri sp. nov. J. Clin. Microbiol., 1982, 16, 775-778.
Positive results for nitrate reduction, methyl red, Voges–Proskauer, citrate utilization
(Simmons), lipase (corn oil,Tween 40, Tween 60, Tween 80, and tributyrin), esculin hydrolysis (most of them), acid production from: D-
glucose, D-mannitol, salicin, maltose, trehalose, cellobiose, D-arabitol, D-mannose & D-galactose.

Negative results for gelatin hydrolysis, DN-ase, chitinase, polygalacturonase, amylase, indole production, H
2S production (TSI), urea
hydrolysis, phenylalanine deaminase, lysine decarboxylase, tartrate, acid production from: dulcitol, adonitol, myo-inositol, L-arabinose,
L-rhamnose, alpha-methyl-D-glucoside, erythritol, glycerol & mucate.
(c) Costin Stoica
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R E G N U M
PROKARYOTAE
 
Ornithine
decarboxylase
Malonate
utilization
Melibiose
fermentation
Raffinose
fermentation
D-Sorbitol
fermentation
Sucrose
fermentation
D-xylose
fermentation
C. davisae
+
+
-
-
-
+
+
C. lapagei
-
+
-
-
-
-
-
C. neteri
-
+
-
-
+
+
+
C. species 3
-
-
+
+
-
d
+
C. species 5
d
-
+
+
+
+
+
Differential characters between species:
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